Former NYC Mayor Bill De Blasio pushes ferry, Rikers plan in recent hours

Not content to make life hell for New Yorkers for eight full years, now- (thankfully) –former Mayor Bill de Blasio ran to prolong the pain long after he was gone. Last week, he delivered two more 11-hour thumbs-in-the-eye for Gotham: pushing further with plans to replace Rikers prisons with local amenities in four boroughs and expand his money-losing, underutilized city ferry service.

His prison plan never made sense: Rikers is a disaster, but it can certainly be rebuilt at its current location instead of inflicting new prisons on neighborhoods that absolutely do not want them. Nevertheless, Wednesday he announced the selection of six firms that will compete to design and build the new prisons. Mayor Eric Adams can expect continued opposition from the local community unless he is wise enough to elaborate on the entire scheme.

And Tuesday, Blas announced the opening of a NYC ferry stop in The Bronx. Never mind that the service he started a few years back has been a financial bust that primarily serves exclusive New Yorkers and tourists. Last year, The Post revealed that Team de Blasio misled the public and the city council about the highly subsidized ferry system’s rider numbers, after its own investigations showed that riders were quirky white and exclusive.

The $ 335 million Citywide Ferry Service was devised by Mayor Bill de Blasio, who connects Manhattan with Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx.
The $ 335 million Citywide Ferry Service was devised by Mayor Bill de Blasio, who connects Manhattan with Brooklyn, Queens and the Bronx.
Photo from AP / Gerald Herbert
The biggest challenge that former Mayor Bill De Blasio faced was the rapid deterioration of living conditions on Rikers Island.
The biggest challenge ex-mayor Bill De Blasio faced was the rapid deterioration of living conditions on Rikers Island.
AP Photo / Seth Wenig, Phil

Even before the pandemic, in October 2019, the NYC Ferry served only about 4 million passengers a year, fewer than the subways on an average day, and offered an operating grant of $ 10.73 per day. .

Last week, the now-ex-mayor also changed the process for parents to appeal special decisions to their children.

All of this comes after a series of other last-minute moves to hamper his successor: the creation of supervised IV drug injection sites, the abolition of gifted and talented programs in urban schools, and the introduction of a private-sector vaccine mandate. . .

Blas may have tried to tie Adams’ hands, but if the new mayor wants to avoid scratching and relieving New Yorkers, he will find a way to take a devastating bullet to all of his predecessor’s mistakes.

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