Britain will have to learn to live with Covid as an 'endemic' disease for many years, experts say | MCU Times

Britain will have to learn to live with Covid as an ‘endemic’ disease for many years, experts say

Britain will have to learn to live with Covid as an ‘endemic’ disease for many years, experts say

  • Britain will have to learn to live with Covid as an ‘endemic’ disease for many years, according to leaked documents
  • The virus is expected to remain widespread in the population with ‘seasonal increases’ in winter as influenza
  • Covid is set on what government health experts call a ‘steady state’










Britain will have to learn to live with Covid as an ‘endemic’ disease for many years, according to leaked documents obtained by Mail on Sunday.

The virus is expected to remain widespread in the population with ‘seasonal increases’ in winter such as influenza and other respiratory diseases.

But thanks to vaccine booster jabs, Covid is expected to go into what government health experts call a ‘steady state’, with hospital admissions not expected to exceed recent levels of around 750 patients a day.

“Given the scale of transmission worldwide, we now need to consider how society can simultaneously suppress and live with the virus and reach an endemic state in the years to come,” a document outlining the fall strategy for the NHS Test and The trace service, informs.

The virus is expected to remain widespread in the population with 'seasonal increases' in winter such as influenza and other respiratory diseases

The virus is expected to remain widespread in the population with ‘seasonal increases’ in winter such as influenza and other respiratory diseases

The documents describe in detail for the first time the four different planning scenarios that have supported Boris Johnson’s response to the third wave of the virus. They include an optimistic scenario, called ‘fast goodbye’, where Covid cases would have peaked in July at 30,000 a day, and a ‘reasonably worst case’ scenario, called ‘long goodbye’, which predicts a summer peak of 85,000 cases per day. . day.

The central planning assumption is known as ‘leaving soon’ and would have involved a peak in July of 65,000 cases per day with ‘modest levels’ in October. In fact, all the scenarios were wrong.

Daily British cases in the third wave peaked in July with 54,674, but then remained high for three months, hitting 52,009 on 21 October. Since then, the numbers have been falling steadily before moving slightly upwards in recent days.

Daily British cases in the third wave peaked in July with 54,674, but then remained high for three months, hitting 52,009 on 21 October.  Since then, the numbers have been falling steadily before moving slightly upwards in recent days

Daily British cases in the third wave peaked in July with 54,674, but then remained high for three months, hitting 52,009 on 21 October. Since then, the numbers have been falling steadily before moving slightly upwards in recent days

The central planning assumption is known as 'leaving soon' and would have involved a peak in July of 65,000 cases per day with 'modest levels' in October.  In fact, all the scenarios were wrong

The central planning assumption is known as ‘leaving soon’ and would have involved a peak in July of 65,000 cases per day with ‘modest levels’ in October. In fact, all the scenarios were wrong

Johnson warned last week that

Johnson warned last week that “storm clouds” were gathering over Europe, saying cases could rise in the UK

Public officials also privately believe that a goal by the World Health Organization to get 70 percent of the world vaccinated is 'unlikely'.  Nearly 80 countries, half of them in Africa, are set to miss out on a separate target of vaccinating 40 percent of their population by the end of this year

Public officials also privately believe that a goal by the World Health Organization to get 70 percent of the world vaccinated is ‘unlikely’. Nearly 80 countries, half of them in Africa, are set to miss out on a separate target of vaccinating 40 percent of their population by the end of this year

Ominous warns government documents that “an extreme event could occur at any time”. This could include the spread of a vaccine-breaking new strain or “serious supply chain problems” with booster jabs.

“In any of our scenarios, there is potential for an unforeseen event or combination of events to occur, derail our planning, and leave us in a worst-case scenario with no end in sight,” a document warns.

New ‘variants of concern’, such as the Delta tribe, which arrived earlier this year and quickly swept the country, remain a ‘very real risk’, it is claimed, especially if many people have Covid.

Johnson warned last week that “storm clouds” were gathering over Europe, saying cases could rise in the UK.

Separate scenarios reported in the newspaper ii yesterday show that the government does not expect the pandemic to be declared over for at least another year.

Public officials also privately believe that a goal by the World Health Organization to get 70 percent of the world vaccinated is ‘unlikely’.

Nearly 80 countries, half of them in Africa, are set to miss out on a separate target of vaccinating 40 percent of their population by the end of this year.

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