How long will I live? Dr. Michael Mosley’s simple chair test can tell

Dr.  In an old column, Mosley had shared a simple chair test that could determine how well you age and how long you can live.

Dr. In an old column, Mosley had shared a simple chair test that could determine how well you age and how long you can live. | Photo credit: iStock images

Key highlights

  • A person’s ability to stand on one leg for extended periods of time can predict how healthy a person is and how long he or she can live.
  • In addition to sitting on and standing from a chair, standing on one leg with eyes closed and controlling the grip was also part of the research on longevity.
  • Of all three, standing on one leg was the test of priority for experts.

New Delhi: Sheldon Cooper once tried to determine when he would die by putting together several variables. From changing his diet to exercising – he made changes to promote longevity. When he was the genius he was, ‘The Big Bang Theory’ fame made the right choice, as diet is one of the most important deciding factors affecting life expectancy and the risk of chronic diseases. But do you ever want to assess how long you are likely to live? According to the British TV veteran producer Dr. Michael Mosley is there a way to understand how long you can live.

The test that determines longevity

Dr. In an old column, Mosley had shared a simple chair test that could determine how well you age and how long you can live. Strange as it may sound, the expert revealed that a person’s ability to stand on one leg for a long time can predict how healthy a person is and how long he or she can live. And now the same can be checked with another test that only needs one chair.

Follow these steps to perform the test:

  1. Find a chair without arms
  2. Sit on it
  3. See how many times you are able to go from sitting to standing in a minute

According to a 1999 study that looked at 2,760 men and women in their 50s, it was found that people who managed to do it more than 36 times were twice as likely to live as much as 13 extra years in as opposed to those who could only do so. 23.

Is it all to test longevity?

In addition to sitting on and standing from a chair, standing on one leg with eyes closed and controlling the grip was also part of the research on longevity. The experts discovered – when they followed up with participants after 13 years – that performance in the tests predicted their likelihood of succumbing to heart attack or cancer.

Of all three, standing on one leg was the test of priority for experts. They recommended getting someone to measure the time for you while standing on one leg with your eyes closed – stop taking time the moment you start to lose your balance. After three attempts at once, measure the average time. Experts determined that those who could balance for 10 seconds or more were three times less likely to die over the next 13 years as opposed to those who could maintain the position for two seconds or less.

Dr. Mosley recommended people in their 40s do this for 13 seconds, and after 50 seconds one should aim for eight seconds or more. In the 60s, the safe average comes down to four seconds.

Disclaimer: Tips and suggestions mentioned in the article are for general information purposes only and should not be construed as professional medical advice. Always consult your doctor or health care professional if you have specific questions about a medical issue.

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