Jamie Lee Curtis on how Janet Leigh may have seen #MeToo

Jamie Lee Curtis, daughter of Hollywood legends Janet Leigh and Tony Curtis, believes her late mother would not have welcomed the revolutionary #MeToo movement.

The topic came up when the “Halloween Kills” star and producer recently spoke with co-star and longtime friend Melanie Griffith about Leigh’s work with Alfred Hitchcock.

Leigh was nominated for an Oscar for his performance in “Psycho.” Griffith’s mother, Tippi Hedren, starred in Hitchcock’s “The Birds” and “Marnie” and accused the director of sexual assault and misconduct.

“I do not know how he felt about your mother, but he was apparently not very good to my mother,” Griffith, 64, said in the actors’ interview magazine chat published Friday.

“I don’t think Janet would ever have recognized if there was bad behavior,” Curtis, 62, said.

“It was her, it’s a bad expression, but a kind of pollyannaish about the industry,” Curtis explained. “I think the #MeToo movement would have really upset her. It’s not fair to unpack it, because she’s dead and I’m going to put words in her mouth, but knowing her, I think she would not say he had behaved wrongly in any way. But it is interesting that our mothers may have been in competition with each other. ”

Both Leigh and Hedren, 91, were labeled “Hitchcock Blondes” – along with Grace Kelly and Kim Novak – while starring in the veteran filmmaker’s biggest hits. But Curtis and Griffith did not think their mothers were friends because the women “worked individually with him.” Incidentally, Curtis paid tribute to her mother and “Psycho” last week when she dressed up as Leigh’s “Psycho” character, Marion Crane, for the Hollywood premiere of “Halloween Kills.”

A woman in a clean, white dress posing with a woman in a black dress

Janet Leigh and her daughter, acting colleague Jamie Lee Curtis, are attending a 1998 event in Beverly Hills.

(Ron Galella Collection via Getty)

The honor released “Tippi: A Memoir” in 2016, decades after Hitchcock’s death in 1980 and a year before the #MeToo movement revealed ubiquitous sexual misconduct in Hollywood and beyond. In the book, Hedren claimed that the director had abused and sexually assaulted her – a tale that was dramatized in the 2012 HBO movie “The Girl” – and accused him of punishing and harassing her on the board as well as sabotaging her career for having disproved his progress.

“Maybe [they were in competition] but your mother was Hollywood royalty, ”Griffith told Curtis. “My mother later became Hollywood royalty later, but she was an anomaly and did not last long with Hitchcock. It was a sad story. You know she was from the #MeToo movement and it was not accepted at the time. She was cut off and he made sure she was cut off. ”

Curtis said: “I’m not saying my mother would not have stood up to him, but until her death she was nothing but grateful to Hitchcock and Alma. [Reville, Hitchcock’s wife]. ”

She added that she did not think Leigh “would ever have acknowledged” that something was wrong, “because from her point of view she was just grateful. That was very much her position. I think she would have looked at it as: ‘That’s just the way it was’.

Leigh, who also starred in Orson Welles’ “Touch of Evil” and John Frankenheimer’s “The Manchurian Candidate,” died in 2004 of vasculitis, an inflammation of the blood vessels.

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Jamie Lee Curtis on how Janet Leigh may have seen #MeToo

Jamie Lee Curtis, daughter of Hollywood legends Janet Leigh and Tony Curtis, believes her late mother would not have welcomed the revolutionary #MeToo movement.

The topic came up when the “Halloween Kills” star and producer recently spoke with co-star and longtime friend Melanie Griffith about Leigh’s work with Alfred Hitchcock.

Leigh was nominated for an Oscar for his performance in “Psycho.” Griffith’s mother, Tippi Hedren, starred in Hitchcock’s “The Birds” and “Marnie” and accused the director of sexual assault and misconduct.

“I do not know how he felt about your mother, but he was apparently not very good to my mother,” Griffith, 64, said in the actors’ interview magazine chat published Friday.

“I don’t think Janet would ever have recognized if there was bad behavior,” Curtis, 62, said.

“It was her, it’s a bad expression, but a kind of pollyannaish about the industry,” Curtis explained. “I think the #MeToo movement would have really upset her. It’s not fair to unpack it, because she’s dead and I’m going to put words in her mouth, but knowing her, I think she would not say he had behaved wrongly in any way. But it is interesting that our mothers may have been in competition with each other. ”

Both Leigh and Hedren, 91, were labeled “Hitchcock Blondes” – along with Grace Kelly and Kim Novak – while starring in the veteran filmmaker’s biggest hits. But Curtis and Griffith did not think their mothers were friends because the women “worked individually with him.” Incidentally, Curtis paid tribute to her mother and “Psycho” last week when she dressed up as Leigh’s “Psycho” character, Marion Crane, for the Hollywood premiere of “Halloween Kills.”

A woman in a clean, white dress posing with a woman in a black dress

Janet Leigh and her daughter, acting colleague Jamie Lee Curtis, are attending a 1998 event in Beverly Hills.

(Ron Galella Collection via Getty)

The honor released “Tippi: A Memoir” in 2016, decades after Hitchcock’s death in 1980 and a year before the #MeToo movement revealed ubiquitous sexual misconduct in Hollywood and beyond. In the book, Hedren claimed that the director had abused and sexually assaulted her – a tale that was dramatized in the 2012 HBO movie “The Girl” – and accused him of punishing and harassing her on the board as well as sabotaging her career for having disproved his progress.

“Maybe [they were in competition] but your mother was Hollywood royalty, ”Griffith told Curtis. “My mother later became Hollywood royalty later, but she was an anomaly and did not last long with Hitchcock. It was a sad story. You know she was from the #MeToo movement and it was not accepted at the time. She was cut off and he made sure she was cut off. ”

Curtis said: “I’m not saying my mother would not have stood up to him, but until her death she was nothing but grateful to Hitchcock and Alma. [Reville, Hitchcock’s wife]. ”

She added that she did not think Leigh “would ever have acknowledged” that something was wrong, “because from her point of view she was just grateful. That was very much her position. I think she would have looked at it as: ‘That’s just the way it was’.

Leigh, who also starred in Orson Welles’ “Touch of Evil” and John Frankenheimer’s “The Manchurian Candidate,” died in 2004 of vasculitis, an inflammation of the blood vessels.

Follow us on Google News

Disclaimers for mcutimes.com

All the information on this website - https://mcutimes.com - is published in good faith and for general information purpose only. mcutimes.com does not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. Any action you take upon the information you find on this website (mcutimes.com), is strictly at your own risk. mcutimes.com will not be liable for any losses and/or damages in connection with the use of our website.

Give a Comment