Members of Congress are making remarks on the anniversary of the January 6 Capitol attack

Note: The live video above may contain language / images that some find disturbing. The United States marks a year since the deadly Capitol attack on January 6th. In the year since, Congress is still deeply divided. Instead of a national crisis pulling the country together, the deadly riots of January 6, 2021, only seem to have pushed lawmakers further apart. Some members plan to mark the anniversary of the Capitol uprising with a moment of silence. Others will spend the day educating Americans about the workings of democracy. And yet others do not at all believe that the deadliest domestic attack on Congress in the nation’s history needs to be remembered. Where they stand on remembrance can be largely attributed to their political party, a shaky disagreement that shows that the country’s legislators remain strikingly divided over how to unite a divided nation. Here’s what lawmakers do to remember January 6, 2021 (all times are EST): 12:30 Republican leaders and lawmakers are largely stayed away from today’s memorial events and considered them overly politicized. From Florida, Trump rejected a statement claiming that Biden was trying to “further divide America. This political theater is all just a distraction.” former president. “What a cheeky politicization of January 6 by President Biden,” tweeted Senator Lindsey Graham. RC, a at times Trump confidant. Others, including Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, were absent, with a contingent attending the funeral of a former Sen. colleague. Johnny Isakson of Georgia. Table of detainees: Dinner A prayer and a moment of silence are held on the floor of the House of Representatives to mark a year since the riot in the Capitol. House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also made remarks, praising the Capitol police wounded as well as those who died in the wake of the attack. “Because of them, Congress was able to defeat the uprising and return to the Capitol that night to ensure , that the peaceful transfer of power took place, “Pelosi said. “Because of them and our members, the uprising failed.” See Pelosi’s remarks in the video above. Capitol on January 6, 2021. “Too many, often depending on their fidelity, seem desperate to sweep the memory of January 6 under the rug. Too many are working to rewrite the story of what happened, to downplay or apologize or even defend the mob to apologize for a revolt from this very Capitol. ” Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer spoke first, while others were to follow. “We are ignoring the January 6 lessons at our own risk,” Republican U.S. Sen. Mitt Romney of Utah said in a statement on Twitter. “Democracy is fragile; it cannot survive without leaders with integrity and character who care more about the strength of our republic than about winning the next election.” Democratic U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts marked the anniversary by pushing for voting rights. “The Senate cannot turn a blind eye to the ongoing attack on free and fair elections,” Warren said. “We need to pass legislation to protect voting rights.” 10 am Former President Donald Trump responded to President Joe Biden’s speech and called it political theater, saying it was pushing to “further divide America.” He also reiterated several false claims about the legitimacy of the election. Map of arrests of the Capitol uprising on January 6: 9. President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris make remarks reflecting back on a year since the deadly riot. Biden was critical of former President Donald Trump in his speech. “For the first time in our history, a president not only lost an election, he was trying to prevent the peaceful transfer of power when a violent mob violated the Capitol,” Biden said. “But they failed.” “Democracy was attacked,” the president of the Capitol said. “We people persevere. We the people prevailed.” See President Biden’s remarks above “On January 6, we all saw what our nation would look like if the forces seeking to dissolve our democracy succeed: lawlessness, violence, chaos, “Vice President Kamala Harris said in his remarks.” When I meet young people, they often ask about the state of our democracy. About January 6. What I tell them is: January 6 reflects the dual nature of democracy. fragility and its fragility strength. ” See Vice President Harris’ remarks over 8:40 amBiden and Harris arrive at the US Capitol. Biden told reporters: “I pray we never get another day like we had a year ago today.”

Note: The live video above may contain language / images that some find disturbing.

The United States marks a year since the deadly Capitol attack on January 6th. In the year since, Congress is still deeply divided.

Instead of a national crisis pulling the country together, the deadly riots of January 6, 2021, only seem to have pushed lawmakers further apart.

Some members plan to mark the anniversary of the Capitol uprising with a moment of silence. Others will spend the day educating Americans about the workings of democracy.

And yet others do not at all believe that the most deadly domestic attack on Congress in the nation’s history needs to be remembered.

Where they stand on remembrance can be largely attributed to their political party, a shaky disagreement that shows that the country’s legislators still strikingly disagree on how to unite a divided nation.

Here’s what legislators are doing to remember January 6, 2021 (all times are EST):

12:30

Republican leaders and lawmakers largely stay away from today’s memorial events and see them as over-politicized.

From Florida, Trump rejected a statement in which he claimed that Biden was trying to “divide America further. This political theater is all just a distraction.”

Even among the congressional Republicans who condemned the attack in the days that followed, most have remained loyal to the former president.

“What a cheeky January 6 politicization of President Biden,” tweeted Senator Lindsey Graham, RS.C., a at times Trump confidant. Others, including Senate Republican leader Mitch McConnell, were absent, with a contingent attending the funeral of a former Sen. colleague. Johnny Isakson of Georgia.

Table of those arrested:

Dinner

A prayer and a moment of silence is held on the floor of the House of Representatives to mark a year since the riot at the Capitol.

House Speaker Nancy Pelosi also made remarks, paying tribute to the wounded Capitol police officers as well as those who died in the wake of the attack.

“Because of them, Congress was able to defeat the uprising and return to the Capitol that night to ensure that the peaceful transfer of power took place,” Pelosi said. “Because of them, and our members, the uprising failed.”

See Pelosi’s remarks in the video above

11:30

Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer went to the Senate on Thursday to urge others to talk about the true consequences of what happened at the U.S. Capitol on January 6, 2021.

“Too many, often depending on their fidelity, seem desperate to sweep the memory of January 6 under the rug. Too many are working to rewrite the story of what happened, to downplay or apologize or even defend the mob, to excuse a revolt of this very capital. “

11 in the morning

Lawmakers are giving speeches on the floor of the U.S. Senate on the anniversary of the January 6 riots at the Capitol. Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer spoke first, while others were to follow.

President Joe Biden, right, joined Senate Majority Leader Chuck Schumer x28; D-NY), center, and House Speaker Nancy Pelosi (D-NY), walk through The Hall of Columns before speaking during the ceremony on the first anniversary of the deadly uprising at the United States Capitol on January 6, 2022 in Washington, DC

Stefani Reynolds-Pool / Getty Images


10:50

Prominent members of Congress make public statements about the one-year commemoration of the Capitol riot.

“We are ignoring the January 6 lessons at our own risk,” Republican U.S. Senator Mitt Romney of Utah said in a statement on Twitter. “Democracy is fragile; it cannot survive without leaders of integrity and character who care more about the strength of our republic than about winning the next election.”

This content is imported from Twitter. You may find the same content in a different format, or you may find more information on their site.

Democratic U.S. Senator Elizabeth Warren of Massachusetts marked the anniversary by pushing for legislation on the right to vote.

“The Senate cannot turn a blind eye to the ongoing attack on free and fair elections,” Warren said. “We need to pass legislation to protect the right to vote.”

This content is imported from Twitter. You may find the same content in a different format, or you may find more information on their site.

10 in the morning

Former President Donald Trump responded to President Joe Biden’s speech, calling it political theater and saying it was pushing to “further divide America.” He also reiterated several false claims about the legitimacy of the election.

Map of arrests of Capitol uprising on January 6:

9 in the morning

President Biden and Vice President Kamala Harris make remarks that reflect back on a year since the deadly riot.

Biden was critical of former President Donald Trump in his speech.

“For the first time in our history, a president not only lost an election, he was trying to prevent the peaceful transfer of power when a violent mob broke into the Capitol,” Biden said. “But they failed.”

“Democracy was attacked,” the president said at the Capitol. “We people persevere. We people won.”

See President Biden’s remarks above

“On January 6, we all saw what our nation would look like if the forces seeking to dismantle our democracy succeed: lawlessness, violence, chaos,” Vice President Kamala Harris said in his remarks.

“When I meet young people, they often ask about the state of our democracy. About January 6. What I tell them is: January 6 reflects the dual nature of democracy. Its fragility and strength.”

See Vice President Harris’ remarks above

8:40

Biden and Harris arrive at the US Capitol.

Biden told reporters: “I pray we never get another day like we had a year ago today.”

.

Follow us on Google News

Disclaimers for mcutimes.com

All the information on this website – https://mcutimes.com – is published in good faith and for general information purposes only. mcutimes.com does not make any warranties about the completeness, reliability, and accuracy of this information. Any action you take upon the information you find on this website (mcutimes.com), is strictly at your own risk. mcutimes.com will not be liable for any losses and/or damages in connection with the use of our website.

Give a Comment