More than HALF of women ‘have had their menstrual and sex lives disrupted during Covid’

More than HALF of women have had their menstrual and sex lives disrupted during Covid due to the stress of the pandemic, study claims

  • More than half of women experienced change in menstrual cycle during pandemic
  • Researchers at Trinity College Dublin studied over 1,300 women in April 2021
  • They said the changes were due to an increase in anxiety, depression and sleep problems










More than half of women experienced changes in their menstrual cycle in the first year of Covid, a study has found.

And the majority also have a decreased sex drive.

Irish researchers who surveyed 1,000 women believe the stress of the pandemic is likely to be to blame.

They said the ‘unprecedented psychological burden’ caused by the Covid crisis increased anxiety and depression and reduced sleep quality, which has a contagious effect on reproductive health.

Health executives are currently investigating reports of tens of thousands of women in the UK suffering from heavier-than-normal menstruation after receiving a Covid plug. Some women have complained of earlier or later menstrual periods.

A study of more than 1,000 women conducted by researchers in Ireland found that women reported more missed periods, worse premenstrual symptoms and a decreased sex drive since the onset of the pandemic

A study of more than 1,000 women conducted by researchers in Ireland found that women reported more missed periods, worse premenstrual symptoms and a decreased sex drive since the onset of the pandemic

British study assessing whether Covid vaccines may interfere with periods, ‘may not find anything because it is too small’

A British study assessing whether Covid vaccines may interfere with periods may not find anything because it is too small, scientists say.

Reproduction experts based at Imperial College London are currently monitoring the menstrual cycles of 250 women before and after inoculation.

But leading researcher Dr. Victoria Male said the small number of participants means the survey will not capture a potential link unless it is ‘really common’ – affecting more than one in ten women.

To prove a connection, researchers need to study normal period changes from those that may have been triggered by inoculations.

However, because menstrual problems, which are often transient, affect about one in ten women each year, thorough research is needed to determine if the plug is really to blame.

Period problems, which are of a transient nature, affect approximately one in ten women each year.

But vaccines and viruses are known to disrupt the menstrual cycle, although experts insist they have no effect on fertility.

The study will be presented at the Society for Endocrinology’s annual conference in Edinburgh.

Researchers at Trinity College Dublin examined 1,300 women in April 2021 and asked about their menstrual disorders – including irregular, absent, painful or heavy periods and premenstrual symptoms.

They also collected information about their sleep quality, anxiety and depression levels.

About 56 percent of participants said their menstrual cycle had changed since the beginning of the pandemic.

The average length of a cycle (28 to 30 days) and period (four to five days) remained the same – but the number of days between the women with the shortest and longest cycles increased significantly.

Meanwhile, nearly two-thirds said their premenstrual symptoms were worse, and 54 percent said they had a decreased sex drive.

The changes were more prevalent among women who reported mental illness and poor sleep.

And the number of severe anxiety, depression and poor sleep was more than double the level from pre-pandemic levels among ‘women of childbearing age’.

Researchers said the results indicate high stress levels and disturbances in sleep can disrupt menstrual cycles, according to other studies.

Stress indirectly suppresses female body mechanisms by stopping sex hormones from being released, the researchers said.

The academics plan to conduct the survey every six months to determine if the disturbance continues. They will also measure participants’ blood pressure, weight and sex hormone levels.

Dr. Michelle Maher, study author, said: ‘Our findings highlight a real need to provide appropriate medical care and mental health support to women affected by menstrual disorders, given the unprecedented psychological burden associated with the pandemic.

“This study was conducted at a relatively early stage of the Covid vaccination program so that the duration of the pandemic and the effectiveness of the vaccine may affect future results, further study with objective, measurable data is needed.”

She added: “We would encourage women who experience reproductive disorders – such as irregular, missed periods, painful or heavy periods, PMS or decreased sex drive – as well as mental health disorders – including symptoms of low mood, anxiety, stress and poor sleep – to see their doctor for advice.

A separate study from Imperial College London monitors the menstrual cycle of 250 women before and after they received their Covid plug.

But leading researcher Dr. Victoria Male said the small number of participants means the survey will not capture a potential link unless it is ‘really common’ – affecting more than one in ten women.

Because menstrual problems affect every tenth woman every year, thorough research is needed to find out if the plug is really to blame.

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