The need for the fourth COVID-19 vaccination booster shot shares experts

Medical experts around the world continue to research solutions to curb the pandemic, and some suggest that a fourth COVID-19 vaccine – another booster shot – may be the key to stopping new variants.

The second booster shot of the COVID-19 vaccine for vulnerable people has been approved in Denmark, Chile and Israel, while ATAGI in Australia has approved a fourth dose for people with weakened immune systems.

But the need for another booster shot for the general population has been the subject of global debate.

Medical experts around the world continue to research solutions to curb the pandemic, and some suggest that a fourth COVID-19 vaccine - another booster shot - may be the key to stopping new variants.
Medical experts around the world continue to research solutions to curb the pandemic, and some suggest that a fourth COVID-19 vaccine – another booster shot – may be the key to stopping new variants. (9 news)

Virologist Dr. Lara Herrero said booster shots could be the key to reducing the impact of COVID-19 and future variants.

“It boosts your immune system, so if you get infected, that infection gets cleared really fast,” she said.

“I think most scientists agree that varieties will be a thing in the future.”

Rod Pearce of the Immunization Coalition said the benefits of a fourth-dose vaccine were being studied and that they had not yet been confirmed as necessary.

“At this stage we do not have the information. We do not have the data and we do not expect a need for the fourth dose for the general community.”

The need for another booster shot for the general population has been the subject of global debate.
The need for another booster shot for the general population has been the subject of global debate. (9 news)

Research currently suggests that three doses of vaccine are 90 percent effective in preventing serious disease from the Omicron variant.

Both Pfizer and Moderna are developing boostershots that specifically protect against Omicron, which could be ready in March.

However, their effectiveness may depend on future mutations of the virus.

Dr. Pearce said vaccines are likely to be developed to cover more strains of the virus.

“We have seen flu vaccines that include four strains instead of just three, so we would expect there to be a combined vaccine,” he said.

Clinical trials are currently underway for Novavax’s combined influenza and COVID-19 jab.

Moderna has also unveiled a single-dose vaccine on the way, which is expected to be launched in 2023.

“With a little luck, it will not be until next year before we need it,” said Dr. Pearce.

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